Senior living straw bale home in Holland, Vermont

Senior living straw bale home in Holland, Vermont

“HOLLAND — With straw bale walls, enclosed in a lime, clay, straw plaster that was mixed on site, it’s not exactly what comes to mind when you think of a senior living facility.

As interest in alternative building methods increases, and the stereotypes that surround Earth-based construction break down, the straw bale structure sitting in Holland, Vermont, is pioneering its way into the future. It is the only straw bale senior living home in the United States.

IMG_9128A little over two months after welcoming in its first residents, the building is gearing up for its first heating season. With heavy winds common at the location, and freezing temperatures on the horizon across the area, the 1900 square foot structure is well equipped to face whatever challenges winter has in store.

The building is a fortress of thermal insulation. The wall structure of the post and beam frame consists of 18 inch wide straw bales. The bales, which sit on a two-foot-high pony wall that forms a base to keep them off the foundation, have an R-value insulation rating of 28. The pony wall is stuffed with super insulated cellulose, with an R-value of 55. The roof also incorporates super insulated cellulose material, and the frost-protected concrete slab that the structure sits on is insulated from underneath, as well as along the sides.”

Read more at the source: Newport Dispatch.com


Comments

Senior Living Straw Bale Home in Vermont — 3 Comments

  1. Thank you and sorry about the multiple questions on that one topic. I did not mean to upset you in any way. Thanks for replying back to me.

  2. Owen hello and once again I am asking this question that creeps into my mind and many others as well. What about mold? and is it bug proof completely on the inside? I am curious to know as well as the earthbag home as well. I do not like bugs and not having to spend the extra money for pest control would also help a lot. :)

    • I just emailed you about 2 hours ago. Earthbags won’t mold because there’s nothing to support the growth of mold. Things such as paper on sheetrock and wood fibers in fiber board or particle board do support the growth of mold. Straw bales can mold if they get wet, particularly if water gets inside the bales. That’s why it’s important to design and build correctly, and use the most appropriate materials. If you’re in a rainy/humid climate such as Georgia then straw bales would not be the best choice. Earthbags would be way more durable.

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