Quonset style home

Quonset style home


Quonset buildings date back to prefab military structures. Today, quonset structures are still used for homes, shops, storage and other buildings. They are economical, very wind and snow resistant, and ecofriendly since over 80% of the steel is recycled content. Kelly Hart built a shop/garage/office quonset building that he covered with bags of scoria (volcanic gravel) for insulation. It’s relatively easy to screw/bolt quonset buildings together with a cordless drill.

Interior of a quonset home

Interior of a quonset home


The main reason for today’s blog post was to showcase the interior of a quonset style home since many people have probably never seen one. As you can see, both the interior and exterior can be quite attractive. Here’s another example from a previous blog post.

Exterior: Steel Master USA
Interior: Houzz.com
Thanks to Leslie for inspiring this blog post.


Comments

Quonset Hut Style Homes — 10 Comments

  1. have 36 lots on the gulf coast that need an in-expensive type application for residential housing–need somebody to help me get started with one or two.I like the look as well as the common sense of the quonset

  2. A bit o f trivia for you.

    The Quonset design was based on the Nissen hut developed by the British during World War I. The British company who held the patent lowered their ownership in name of the war effort during WW II. The original logic of the Nissen hut was it all fit on one truck and could be erected quickly. One of the original designers was a Canadian officer.

    I actually like the design of the Nissen hut better. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissen_hut

    • Glad to see you’re still around Cliff. Haven’t heard from you in a long while. That’s an interesting history lesson. One note is modern quonset buildings are usually deeply molded (formed) for increased strength. This dispenses with the need for a separate steel frame. The recesses can be filled with insulation. Also note, many interesting shapes can be obtained like this one that is cutaway on one side for solar gain: http://www.naturalbuildingblog.com/ohome-passive-solar-studies/

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