Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)

Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)


This 20′ interior diameter, 314 sq. ft. design is my proposed solution to Dustin’s dilemma in Florida for houses that can withstand repeat hurricanes. See How to Build the Strongest Buildings That Can Last Centuries for more details. Features include: lexan windows with removable window and door shutters, monolithic geopolymer slab floor that’s integrated with the walls, build on high ground, plastic mesh that won’t rust, geopolymer plaster both sides, geopolymer pumicecrete or geopolymer perlite fill. Integrating the slab and dome and building on a rubble trench is ideal for seismic zones. In an earthquake, the building would slide back and forth somewhat like an upside down cereal bowl on a kitchen table (meaning the whole house remains intact as one shell).

The design will have to be tweaked for individual homeowner needs, and some details worked out with the engineer. Note how a woodstove is shown to reach a wider audience, even though it’s probably not needed in Florida. The woodstove could be replaced with an emergency water storage and filtration system, etc. A fold-out bed saves space.

Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)

Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)


Comments

Disaster Resistant Hemispheric Dome — 7 Comments

  1. This hemispheric dome was primarily designed for extremely high risk of earthquakes. The group I was working with wanted something that could withstand the worst possible scenario. A hemispheric dome like the one shown above is the ideal shape for earthquake resistance.

    It’s also great for resisting hurricane and tornadoes, although you’re not limited to hemispheric domes for these situations. You could use lots of other dome shapes if you’re not in a high risk seismic zone. Something like the Peace Dome would be fine in hurricane and tornado areas, as long as you do a good job on the plaster. http://earthbagplans.wordpress.com/2010/10/10/earthbag-peace-dome-2/

  2. I am sorry I missed it in your comment, I was studying the drawings both below and the one included in the link above. Both seem to indicate a slab poured separate from the footing. There was no steel connection between the two.

    A few more questions:

    Do you have a conceptual drawing of the steel frame or shell?

    Was there a reason there was no wire mesh in the slab?

    For a full floating effect in an earthquake, what do you think of having rubble/gravel under the entire structure? Sort of like ball bearing.

    Thanks

  3. I was studying the cross section in the earlier post and I am a bit confused. It looks as if the slab and the walls are separate. Also it looks as if you have concrete between the rubble and the pumic-crete. Wouldn’t it be structurally stronger to have the foundation and the slab poured as one monolithic pour with rebar tying the concrete part of the foundation to the walls? Just trying to understand the principle and design.
    Thanks.

    • That previous drawing was from a different project. I used it to show the general idea of pumicecrete inside double ferrocement shells. And in this blog post I explain how it’s best to tie the slab to the walls.

  4. Hi Owen
    Could you post up a cross section of the integrated slab & dome on a rubble foundation? Would the slab/dome just straddle the rubble trench? Or would the dome and slab actually continue into the trench like a concrete footing? I am trying to visualize.
    Thanks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.